Cheatsheet for new counter-espionage rules

ALL TRANSLATIONS ON THIS SITE ARE UNOFFICIAL AND ARE PROVIDED FOR REFERENCE PURPOSES ONLY. THESE TRANSLATIONS ARE CREATED AND CONTINUOUSLY UPDATED BY USERS –THEY ARE FREE TO VIEW, BUT PROPER ATTRIBUTION IS REQUIRED FOR DISTRIBUTION OF THESE OR DERIVATIVE TRANSLATIONS. PAGES WITHOUT IMAGES ARE WORKS IN PROGRESS.

English中文(简体)

In the chart below, I have annotated our translation of the new Implementation Rules in the right-hand column. Cells in Gray are less important, YELLOW are somewhat important, and those in RED are the most important. Much of the new implementation rules is aimed at integrating other laws into the implementation of the 2014 Counter-espionage Law. A few provisions, however, expand the scope or range of of state security powers , some of which may prove important. No provisions introduce new limitations on the exercise of authority. Most important is the expansion of the scope of state security powers in investigating non-espionage related acts of subversion. A new list in article 8 of the Rules goes far in explaining what situations the broad investigative powers apply to, including religious activity seen as threatening national security. Article 21 revises the Law's rule that one is only punished for refusing to hand over evidence against someone one 'knows' is conductin
You have already viewed your free articles this month. Subscribe here for more free access or log in. Our work is labor-intensive and of interest to a limited audience, so we need your support!
About Jeremy Daum 111 Articles
Jeremy Daum is a Senior Fellow of the Yale Law School Paul Tsai China Center, based in Beijing, with over a decade of experience working in China on collaborative legal reform projects. His principal research focus is criminal procedure law, with a particular emphasis on protections of vulnerable populations such as juveniles and the mentally ill in the criminal justice system, and is also an authority on China’s ‘Social Credit System’. Jeremy has spoken about these issues at universities throughout China and in the U.S.; and has co-authored a book on U.S. Capital Punishment Jurisprudence for Chinese readers. He is also the founder and contributing editor of the collaborative translation and commentary site Chinalawtranslate.com, dedicated to improving mutual understanding between legal professionals in China and abroad. He translates, writes, edits, does web-design, graphic design, billing, tech support, and social media outreach for China Law Translate.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*